Latest Psychological Research from the Association for Psychological Science

SUICIDE

NEW MODEL FOR PREDICTING SUICIDE ATTEMPTS & DEATHS
Researchers have developed a new suicide prediction model that substantially outperforms existing self-report tools. The study was published online on May 24, 2018, in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

From the NIMH Outreach Partnership Program Update 

Headlines

Research

Good news for psychologist-masters!  The APA is taking another step toward full recognition of masters-level psychologists by establishing a task force to develop a blueprint for APA to accredit master’s programs in health service psychology.  Read the full press release here.

APA Psychology Benefits Society Blog

AUTISM

INHERITED VARIATIONS IN NON-CODING SECTIONS OF DNA ASSOCIATED WITH AUTISM; STUDY SHEDS LIGHT ON PATERNALLY-INHERITED GENETIC RISK FACTORS
A new study has identified an association between paternally-inherited rare structural variants in noncoding segments of genes and the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study adds to a growing body of research describing genetic contributors to ASD.   Click here to read more. 

News & Information

NIMH UPDATE (September):


Science and Service News Updates

  • Research: Key Brain Circuits for Reward-Seeking & Avoidance Behavior


Resources & Publications

  • Clinical Digest:  Anxiety & Complementary Health Approaches

  • Prevalence & Profile of High Impact Chronic Pain

  • Infographic:  Comorbidity:  Substance Use & Other Mental Disorders
  • Cultural & Population Sensitivity in Disaster Behavioral Health Programs

  • Effects of Natural Disasters on Children & Youth


Clinical Trial Participation

  • Nationwide Recruitment:  Major Depression and Oral Drug AV-101

BRAIN FUNCTION

BIGGER HUMAN BRAIN PRIORITIZES THINKING HUB – AT A COST; NIH STUDY FINDS INFORMATION INTEGRATION TRUMPS EMOTIONAL, SENSORY, MOTOR FUNCTIONS
Some human brains are nearly twice the size of others – but how might that matter? NIMH researchers and their NIH grant-funded colleagues have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain’s shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional area is accounted for by growth in thinking areas of the cortex, or outer mantle – at the expense of relatively slower growth in lower order emotional, sensory, and motor areas.  Click here to read more.

APA PsycPORTTM :

Psychology in the News